human sexualty , and the meaning of silence

human sexualty , and the meaning of silence

Order Description

This final exercise asks you to reflect again on these course goals by focusing on the expressive powers of silence:
Silence itself—the things one declines to say, or is forbidden to name, the discretion that is required between different speakers—is less the absolute limit of discourse, the other side from which it is separated by a strict boundary, than an element that functions alongside the things said, with them and in relation to them within over-all [rhetorical] strategies. There is no binary division to be made between what one says and what one does not say; we must try to determine the different ways of not saying such things . . .
—Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume One: An Introduction, p. 27
How does one talk about what hasn’t been said or shown? Is there a style—a particular literary or cinematic way—of not saying or showing something? If so, does that style differ from author to author, director to director, work to work, or perhaps decade to decade? Do you have a style of communicating something by not saying or showing all that you may be meaning to express?
These questions should have new relevance for you in the wake of our readings, films, and discussions over the course of the semester. Choose passages or scenes from two of the three films: Blue Is the Warmest Color, The Witnesses, and Wild Side—and say what you can about how they seem to refrain from saying or showing (or avowing, disclosing, confirming) something. Do your examples’ ways of not saying or showing something bear on their author’s experiences of or perspectives on their worlds? Do they bear on your own as well? If so, how?
Be as specific as you can, showing how your selected passages and scenes may “speak” even when seemingly silent or reticent.

find the cost of your paper