Fiction in Context

Fiction in Context

use an element of fiction (character; plot; point of view; setting; theme; symbolism, allegory, and image; and style, tone, and language) to compare Stephen Crane’s “Experiment in Misery” and Edith Horton’s “The 400”. DIscuss how point of view plays a huge factor in the comparison. Also, how tone and word choice is so unique and different amongst the two opposing stories. You can also discuss Stephen Crane’s “Experiment in Luxury” as a talking point between it all. This must be making an argument, not just stating things. Discuss how Crane’s original story had an introduction and when published the intro was removed to change the reader’s point of view when reading the story and why that is important. Also it’s importance in comparison to “The 400.” You must make sure you have a thesis that has an argument in which you can explore a point of comparison based on an element of fiction.  Although themes are often easy targets to compare, they might not be as easy to write a paper around.  On the other hand, comparing two different narrator’s point of view and how it affects the reader’s interpretation could be easily mapped out.  Even if you are only using primary sources (the stories themselves), make sure you adequately document your them according to MLA style.art with a clear and concise thesis that provides a path for you to follow—an argument to prove.  Make sure you cover the entire scope of the question. Understand that even though you might be focusing on one specific element of fiction to prove your thesis, you will likely need to use one or more other elements of fiction to back up your argument in the body of your paper.  Consult the Bedford’s Elements of Fiction for help in defining the terms. Cite examples to prove your point through the direct use of the sources—the text, secondary sources, or a film if appropriate; this adds validity to your argument and is a fundamental learning objective of this course. Don’t fall into the trap of listing similarities and/or differences. Those similarities OR differences must serve a point, which in turn should be supportive of your thesis. Avoid sitting on a fence.  If something is obviously similar, you are looking at why.   If something is different, you are looking at why.  You can’t have your cake and eat it too. Simply noting the differences in plot would be an overly obvious comparison and one that would lead to the stifling question of “So what?”

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