Asian Studies

Asian Studies

Order Description

 

ONLINE TAKE-HOME EXAM – The Asian Century – 101957 – Spring 2017

 

Due: 11.30pm Friday 20 October 2017. You need to submit the online take home exam on Turnitin by the due date, with ALL PARTS OF THE EXAM in one document. The turnitin
link can be found on vUWS under Assessment and has the title ‘Online Take Home Exam’. In Part A, only provide the Answers to the multiple-choice and short answer
questions. Just ensure you have the number of the question against your answer.

Aims and Objectives:

This assessment task provides you with the opportunity to develop your written expression and critical thinking skills and to demonstrate your attainment of the unit’s
learning outcomes.

Referencing System: You must use either APA (in-text) or Chicago (footnotes) referencing system. It is recommended that you use the APA and Chicago referencing guide
prepared by the WSU Library. The link to these referencing systems is: https://library.westernsydney.edu.au/main/guides/referencing-citation
Please note that while APA does not require page numbers you must include page numbers in the online take-home exam.

Assessment Requirements:

There are three parts to the online take-home exam and you will be given an overall mark out of 100, which will then be weighted according to the Learning Guide – 30%
of your overall mark for the unit.

Part A – Part A is a combination of multiple-choice and short answer questions based on the material from Weeks 10, 11, 12 and 13. The multiple choice questions will
come from one of the readings for Weeks 10 and 12 and the author is stated in the multiple choice question. For the short answer questions you will need to use both
the readings and the lecture pods. The multiple choice questions are worth 1 mark each and the short answer questions are worth between 2 – 4 marks as outlined against
the question. Part A is worth a maximum of 25 marks.

Part B – You must complete two of the questions in Part B based on the readings provided in each question. Each answer should be approximately 200-250 words in length.
Each question will be worth a maximum of 20 marks with a maximum value of 40 marks for Part B.

Part C – Part C is a 350 word analysis of the essential reading for Week 14. Your analysis must answer the following question:
Is it too early to claim an Asian century? Why, why not?
Part C is worth a maximum of 35 marks.

PART A – Worth 25%

Week 10 – Indonesia – one of Asia’s great powers?

1. From the article by Dirk Tomsa ‘Indonesia in 2016: Jokowi consolidates power’ from week 10, which of these statements is MOST correct? (1 mark)
a) Jokowi consolidated his power as president in 2016 and there was much more coherence and clear direction in his policymaking.
b) Jokowi is still struggling with a clear policy direction and in 2016 the Natuna Islands incidents exposed a lack of coherence in the Indonesian government’s foreign
policy, however, these issues did not damage Jokowi’s public approval ratings in 2016.
c) China’s activities around the Natuna Islands and other parts of the South China Sea have not undermined Indonesia’s long-term policy of neutrality on the South
China Sea.
d) Jokowi consolidated his power in economic policy through infrastructure development and another series of economic reform packages, which resulted in stronger
macro-economic indicators and was greeted with enthusiasm by economic observers.

Answer:

2. In two or three sentences, briefly describe some of the challenges facing Indonesia’s continued progress in the 21st century. To answer this question you may need
to use both the readings for Week 10 and the lecture pods. (3 marks)

3. In two or three sentences, briefly describe the domestic political developments in Jokowi’s second year in office as discussed in the article by Dirk Tomsa
‘Indonesia in 2016: Jokowi consolidates power’ from Week 10. (3 marks)

Week 11 – Southeast Asia and ASEAN

4. In one or two sentences, briefly outline how the policy of non-interference within ASEAN has been tested as discussed in the chapter by Damien Kingsbury ‘Southeast
Asian regionalism’ from Week 11. (2 marks)

5. In three or four sentences, briefly outline the role that China and the US play in ASEAN unity. You can utilise all the readings and lecture pods from Week 11 to
answer this question. (4 marks)

Week 12 – The challenge for Australia in the Asian century?

6. From the chapter by Gill and Jakobson ‘Getting it right for Australia’ from Week 12, which of these statements is MOST correct? (1 mark)

a) Australia does not need to accommodate China. It needs to stand up to Chinese pressure and withstand its annoyance when Australia does not support China’s actions.
b) Australian’s need to take an impartial approach to contentious issues between China and Japan and should refrain from criticising the actions taken by either side.
c) Australia has always been able to rely on the US in response to any security threats and Australia will be able to continue to rely on the US if China chooses to
penalise Australia economically.
d) There are countless opportunities for Australia through Chinese investment, however Australians seem quite ambivalent about this, particularly when Chinese
investment is targeted toward real estate, infrastructure and agriculture

Answer:

7. From the chapter by Gill and Jakobson ‘Getting it right for Australia’ from Week 12, which of these statements is MOST correct? (1 mark)

a) The Australia-China relationship has experienced a number of challenges in the past decade, however these challenges may well be easier to deal with as China’s
economic growth comes to an end.
b) Chinese students represent the largest proportion of foreign students in Australia and Australian educators have put a substantial amount of work into ensuring that
Chinese students have a positive experience and have a close connection with Australian society.
c) Of most concern for Australia is that the security threat from China would be in terms of economic threats, such as restricting Australian agriculture exports to
China or discouraging Chinese students from attending Australian universities and schools.
d) China is now the largest source of tourists for Australia and the Australian tourist sector is well prepared to meet the challenge of the increase in tourist trade
from China.

Answer:

8. In three or four sentences, briefly outline the challenges that face the Australia-China relationship and how these may be overcome as discussed by Bates and
Jakobson in the chapter ‘Getting it right for Australia’ from Week 12. (4 marks)

Week 13 – Central Asia in the Asian century

9. In one or two sentences, briefly describe Central Asian authoritarianism and civil society as outlined by Charles E. Ziegler in his article ‘Great powers, civil
society and authoritarian diffusion in Central Asia’ from Week 13. (2 marks)

10. In three or four sentences, briefly outline the key issues for civil society in the 3 case studies as outlined by Charles E. Ziegler in his article ‘Great powers,
civil society and authoritarian diffusion in Central Asia’ from Week 13. (4 marks)

PART B – Worth 40%

For Part B you are to choose two of the following questions and complete as instructed.

1) It is suggested that Indonesia is showing diplomatic assertiveness and a desire to be acknowledged as a ‘big country’. Read Greg Fealy and Hugh White’s article from
Week 10 and summarise in 200-250 words whether Indonesia’s aspirations will be realised. The reading is:
Fealy, Greg and White, Hugh. (January 2016). Indonesia’s ‘Great Power’ aspirations: A critical view. Asia & the Pacific Policy Studies 3(1), 92-100.

2) In 200-250 words provide a discussion of the following question:
What are some of the challenges for ASEAN in strengthening Southeast Asian regionalism?
To answer the question you are able to uitilise both the readings and the lecture pods from Week 11. The readings are:
Kingsbury, Damien. (2017). Southeast Asian regionalism (pp. 164-171). In Damien Kingsbury, Politics in contemporary Southeast Asia: Authority, democracy and political
change. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. AND
Thayer, Carlyle A. (2016). Southeast Asia’s regional autonomy under stress. Southeast Asian Affairs, 3-18.

3) Read William Tow’s article from Week 12 and provide a 200-250 word summary on the question:
Does the new US administration result in a need for Australia to question its continued reliance on the US?
The reading is:
Tow, William T. (2017). President Trump and the implications for the Australia-US alliance and Australia’s role in Southeast Asia. Contemporary Southeast Asia: A
Journal of International and Strategic Affairs 39(1), 50-57.

4) Read Marcel de Haas’s article from Week 13 and provide a 200-250 word summary of the reading in your own words. For this question you will need to provide a
discussion of the security policy in the Central Asian states by providing a comparison of the security documents and the security challenges for the region. The
reading is:
de Haas, Marcel. (2016). Security policy and developments in Central Asia:
Security documents compared with security challenges. The Journal of Slavic Military Studies 29(2), 203-226.

 

PART C – Worth 35%

For Part C you are to write a 350 word analysis of the essential reading for Week 14. Your analysis must answer the following question:

Is it too early to claim an Asian century? Why, why not?

This exercise does not require you to provide a summary of the arguments within the reading. You must read the article, provide an answer to the question and provide
evidence for your argument based on the different points of view put forward within the article. You must explain why you believe it is too early to claim an Asian
century, or why you believe it is not too early to claim an Asian century based on the information provided in the article. You may also use lecture pods or other
readings we have addressed during the semester, however if you are using other readings these must be limited to two. Please note: It is not a requirement to use other
sources. I want to hear your opinion on this question and the reasons why in terms of your argument.
The reading for Week 14 and this part of the exam is:
Anonymous. (2013). The Asian century: Reality or hype? The International Economy 27(3), 8-31.

Assessment Criteria for Parts B and C:

1) Addressing the question
Your answer must be a response to the question actually asked; therefore your arguments should be relevant to the question. You should demonstrate the relevance in
your answer.

2) Original thought and critical thinking
You should strive to think things through for yourself and come up with original ideas if you can. You should demonstrate the application of critical thinking to the
ideas you encounter. This does not necessarily mean that you should disagree with them (you may or may not as you see fit). It means you should assess them, looking
for their strengths and weaknesses.

3) Coherence and quality of the logic and argument
Your argument must be logical (adhere to the principles of reasoning) and coherent (fit together naturally and in a way that readers can follow). In other words your
argument must make sense with conclusions flowing justifiably from premises. You must be able to justify your views.

4) Use of own words
Using your own words demonstrates that you have genuinely processed the ideas you are using rather than simply collecting the words and ideas of other scholars. In
other words, using your own words helps to make the work your own.

5) Compliance with scholarly conventions
You must comply with scholarly conventions. This means avoiding plagiarism, including the ‘cut and paste’ variety. It also means you should correctly and diligently
cite the sources, both in footnotes or in-text referencing and bibliography, and use quotation marks where appropriate. Assignments that are poorly referenced or which
in other ways are deficient in adhering to scholarly conventions will be penalised.

6) English expression, correct spelling and grammar
Your assignment should be well written. The English expression should be clear, even elegant if you can manage it. It should be grammatically correct and without
spelling and typographical errors.

Parts B and C: Marking Guide
Criteria/
Standards
Excellent
(85-100)
Very Good
(75-84)
Good
(65-74)
Fair
(50-64)
Unsatisfactory
(0-49)
Addressing the question
Clearly defined and justified approach, perhaps an innovative approach and demonstrating perceptive awareness of the issues
Clearly defined and justified approach, demonstrating some perceptive awareness of the issues
Well defined and justified approach, or clearly defined but less well justified, or vice versa, awareness of the issues
Some attempt to define and justify approach but not well executed, limited awareness of the issues
Little or no attempt to define and justify the approach, or very poorly executed, little or no awareness of the issues
Original thought and critical thinking
Insightful and original ideas, highly analytical and not descriptive, high level of critical thinking
Original thought, high quality of critique
Some original thought, good quality of critique
Little attempt at original thought, low or fair quality of critique
No attempt at original thought, no or low quality of critique
Logic and coherence of argument
Consistently clear and highly rigorous logic, clear and coherent development of a high quality argument
Sound logic, high quality argument, coherent
Logical, good argument, generally coherent
Inconsistent logic, a reasonable attempt at argument, some coherence
Poor logic, no attempt at argument or very weak argument not coherent
Use of own words
Written entirely in own words and well executed paraphrasing
Use of own words throughout, high quality paraphrasing
Use of own words mostly or throughout, good paraphrasing
Use of own words mostly, fair quality or inconsistent paraphrasing
Too close to text, bordering on plagiarism or crude ‘cut and paste’
Compliance with scholarly conventions
Complete compliance with referencing style and due acknowledgement of sources and ideas with no or very minor mistakes
Mostly compliant with referencing style and due acknowledgement of sources and ideas with few mistakes
Good effort, but with minor lapses in compliance with referencing style, and/or in acknowledgement of sources and ideas
Basic effort to comply with referencing style and to acknowledge sources and ideas properly but with many mistakes
Little or no compliance with referencing style and/or acknowledgement of sources and ideas
English expression
Fluent, literate, clear and elegant with no, or only very minor grammatical or spelling errors
Fluent, literate, clear sentences with very few grammatical or spelling errors
Generally well written and literate with some lapses in clarity or some clumsy sentences and/or with some grammatical and spelling errors
Not well written, with some unclear passages, some poorly constructed sentences or paragraphing with too many grammatical and/or spelling errors
Badly written, unclear, many sentences poorly constructed with many errors in grammar and spelling – does not meet minimum literacy standards

ALL WRITTEN WORK IN THIS CATEGORY WILL FAIL
find enclosed the online take-home exam due at 11.30pm on Friday 20 October 2017. Please ensure that you submit on turnitin in one document and that you DO NOT
include the questions as this will increase your turnitin similarity report. You must ensure that you put the number of the question for your answer. This is
particularly important for Part A. You do not have to complete any other research for this assessment. You only need to use the lecture pod recordings and the readings
for Weeks 10 – 14. If you wish to use other readings and lecture pods from the semester you can do this, however it is not required.

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