Argument as Conversation

Argument as Conversation

Paper instructions:
PART A. Read and mark “Argument as Conversation” by Stuart Greene (on Blackboard; download and print)

PART B.  Developing Key Terms

B1.  Before you read the piece, select at least 2 words from the reading that are unfamiliar to you.  For each word, 1) write the entire sentence in which it appears 2) try to write a definition of the word based on what you think it means in this sentence, 3) look the word up in the dictionary and write the dictionary definition that best fits the word in this sentence.

B2.  After you read the piece, for each word, use the word in a sentence that you created.

(Don’t just copy a sentence from the dictionary!  One of the best ways to learn vocabulary is to try using it on your own.)

PART C. Making Connections (1-2 pages, typed, double-spaced, in Times New Roman font)

1.    What is your definition of argument?  How is your definition different from/similar to Greene’s definition of an argument?
2.    Do you find the metaphor of writing as a conversation that Kenneth Burke describes in paragraph 6 useful in terms of understanding how writing works (in the university)? Why or why not?

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